Atelophobia

Living With Atelophobia

Living with Atelophobia

livingwithLike any other phobia, atelophobia is an obstacle in the path of normal life. While normal people compete with others, win and lose, show off their talents and communicate with one another with ease, an atelophobic finds his life in a jeopardy when he has to face other people. This makes living with atelophobia a tough job.

He is extremely scared because he thinks that whatever he is going to do will be full of errors. This fear does not abandon him even in very small tasks of daily routine. For instance, if he is with his relatives on a dinner, he won’t be able to eat properly because he thinks that his way of eating is not right and he is making a mistake that the people around him are noticing. Similarly, if he is making a phone call and there are some people around him, he will be extremely scared that he will say wrong words, or the things he is saying are words worth making fun of. Even talking in general in front of other people is a very very difficult thing for a person living with atelophobia.

“Competition”, which is a very normal thing for normal people, is a trouble for an atelophobic. When a normal person loses, he might get a little disappointed but later gets over it and controls his feelings. On the other hand, when a person living with atelophobia faces a failure, he is unable to bear it. He becomes extremely disappointed and starts doubting his abilities. He starts to think that he can never do that thing properly. He considers himself a stupid person who does not have the capability to do anything properly. This doubt further masks his abilities. Although an atelophobic might have talents and intelligence, this lack of self confidence snatches it all from him. The poor guy is unable to do anything because of his mental illness. He moves closer to depression with every disappointment.

The person living with atelophobia is also a sufferer of the symptoms of anxiety. His too much fear and tension makes him anxious almost all the time. His heart beats fast, something that generally indicates temporary fear or anxiety. He breathes in and out quickly. And another thing seen in that person is, he is sweaty all the time. All the tension he has on his mind makes him perspire heavily. He might complain of nausea often. Sometimes his anxiety increases so much that he faces panic attacks. What really happens is, when he sees a challenge coming, which is part of a normal life for others, he starts to think that he can’t do that. He starts imagining the tragic outcome of the mistakes he might commit during the accomplishment of his task. And, to add to his worry, there are people who will actually notice his “imperfection”. His fear increases and increases until he is paralyzed, unable to move, unable to speak or do anything. These panic attacks are more severe in untreated patients with a higher stage of illness.

Living with atelophobia gets worse when the person is unable to cope with other people in his surrounding. He can not communicate with his relatives and relationships end up completely ruined. People generally do not understand the miserable condition of the patient and leave him because of his irritating behavior. What they don’t know is, they are leaving a person who needs their help, not their rudeness.

So I will pen up with a small piece of advice. Do not leave an angry or sad person alone. Talk to him and be aware of the symptoms of mental illnesses, because sometimes it is someone close who is suffering, and sometimes it is you yourself.